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Fashion hacks: Exciting Ways to bring new life to your wardrobe without shopping

Fashion hacks: Exciting Ways to bring new life to your wardrobe without shopping

Fashion hacks: Exciting Ways to bring new life to your wardrobe without shopping

With more of us trying to save on waste and spend less cash, it could not feel more necessary to make the most of what we have got. Here’s how the specialists do it.

Some things don’t match, don’t suit you, or sound like souvenirs from a forgotten identity crisis. There are cherished gems, yes, but many more cases of buyer’s remorse bookend them.

Not all is lost. An increased interest in repairs and upcycling could bring such unloved garments back to life. Seen anywhere from the rise of alterations companies on Depop to the recent repair “concierge” at Selfridges and with charity shops full and more of us trying to save on waste, spend less money and keep our clothes for longer making the most of what we have got does not feel more timely.

To spin your wardrobe, you do not need sewing skills all the tips below may be taken to a professional, although you will need some time, and to think a little differently about your clothes.

We are so far from the process of producing a clothing item as a community that we do not even understand what is possible with the clothes we already own, says Layla Sargent, who launched The Seam last year to link customers with local seamstresses. Some ideas will send you the following expert tips.

Cuff trouser hems

Sarah Hunter is a fashion junkie who started upcycling and changing charity shops and her current wardrobe about a year ago when she began to feel uncomfortable about “getting trapped with Instagram, as well as the concept of purchasing a lot of things for the grid.” After studying costume design in the 90s, she has outstanding sewing abilities, and her Instagram is full of fun, motivating fashion-hack.

From jogging bottoms to jumpsuits, elastic cuffing is very simple and can transform any wide-legged pants, provided the fabric is “flimsy” enough to take on the new shape. There are plenty of YouTube tutorials, but Hunter believes the easiest way is to make a small opening at the seam of an existing hem, feed the elastic through the loose end with a safety pin, tie the elastic with a knot and sew the closed opening.

 Office shirts Reassess

Bennett is optimistic about low-waist fashion and claims that office shirts are perfect for reusing (“first because the textile has already been made and is a perfect fabric, and secondly even though they are among the toughest items to sell in donation shop), considering that several office workers want an invaluable opportunity and are only going to buy current concepts. If you have a shirt to alter, Bennett operates a customization program with price ranges.

Transform old T-shirts into jewelry or accessories 

The Black Girl Knit club was formed at the beginning of last year, inspired by the hashtag “#diverseknitty” that advocated for craft and knit variety. Pioneers Sicgmone Kludje and Vea Koranteng identify the group as a “supportive and comfortable space for black women” to foster creative skills and explore sustainability, “in a manner that is exciting and accessible to everyone.” 

One of their top tips for fast fashion includes converting T-shirts into acrylic, that can then be sewed into headbands, wristbands, and bracelets, making great gifts that have hit the end of their lives. You will find descriptions of the T-shirt method here; here’s the bracelet procedure. 

Make use of the portion that is better

If your closet is filled with clothes that’d be perfect if they’d had different sleeves or jumpsuits that are undermined by flabby bottoms with chic necklines, you might try to recycle them using the half you want. For example, Hunter sometimes blends two dresses, sewing the top of a dress to the skirt of another, something a modification service should be able to do for you reasonably cheaply, particularly if the skirt has a waistband installed.

Making a skirt or top by slicing up a dress is an even easier version of this fashion hack.

Reinvigorate your old jeans

“Do not even toss away jeans,” says Hunter, who believes Recycled denim is going to be a huge thing. Many designers work with contrasting jeans, which can give you ideas. Denim hacks vary from minor tapering, transforming broader -legged denim into something sleeker for which she charges about £ 16, to more complex upcycles, such as swapping in contrasting denim panels in denim jackets, one of Bennett’s most popular services.

Hunter purchases kilo-bags of unsaleable denim from the online charity shop Refashion for £ 8 for repairs and panels; she is seriously contemplating inserting triangular boards for a vintage 1970s look into a pair of skinny pants. Bennett is still enthusiastic about fixing denim, and a “big fan” of obvious mending, incorporating embroidery or hand-stitching patches, and closing gaps.

Besides this, for an oversized, baggy jumper made of loopback jersey, Twishika Daley, a designer who deals a lot with The Seam, has put the calves of trashed jeans to good use, upcycling them into the sides. (Depending on the amount of work involved, she might do something similar to your old jeans from around £ 45.) If you’re brave and you know what you want, and you like the frayed look, you can slice the bottom of some jeans quite quickly, or even cut the collar off a denim jacket.

Vintage Scarves Repurpose

Bennett suggests making them into a scrunchie if you have some silk scarves around you that you don’t wear, an easy process that can be done manually, she states “by using a latex strip, thread your new favourite vintage fabric into a small tube, hand insert the rubber into the tube, sludge things up and fix it by hand manually”.

Livia Firth, the Eco-Age founder, and advocate has stepped further and repurposed four of the vintage Hermès scarves of her mother from the 70s and 80s into two maxi skirts, She works with a dressmaker to bring them together, incorporating only a waistband and a side button.

Spice up your sport wears 

When searching for upcycling, people can forget their gym wear, but they can be modified to be very fashionable for many various occasions just by adjusting the fit,’ says Eme Ikpeme with Heather Swindlehurst, the duo behind Hemmed, a Depop shop with its most common styles that has a very distinct aesthetic – quite a body-con take on upcycling – with cropped hoodies and shrunken sports tops.

Once we heard that people were going to want and cut expenses and clean their wardrobes. Donation stores were closed, but many were no longer accepting donations. It does seem like a great idea to provide people with a service that would enable them to love their old dresses. Modifications start at about £ 8, and rarely veer over £ 15, and if you’re not sure what you want, Ikpeme and Swindlehurst will brainstorm ideas for alterations.

Dye it

To give your old dress a new sophisticated look, considering dying with another color is also a perfect idea. 

Written by Mickyglam

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